Mixed Gallery

I do not see my artwork as having a single goal or purpose, any more than my life has just a single goal or purpose. For me, art is simply another tool of the human mind. It is something we use to express, explore and understand ourselves and the world around us. By accepting this, I allow my work to be intuitive and natural - it is about diversity rather than adherence to a single track.

A lot of my art involves using the subconscious, as well as primitive or ancient influences to find deeper truths about the human experience. My abstract artwork is, therefore, a combination of creative and aesthetic decisions made consciously, and the use of intuition and improvisation to allow my subconscious to influence the work.


Giant Holds Owl

Giant Holds Owl
2015, 51x61cm, 275

At the Museum

At the Museum
2010, 51x61cm

Organic Wave

Organic Wave
2009, 61x76cm

Mine

Mine
2006, 35.5x46cm, 195

Land and Sea

Land and Sea
2008, 60x60cm, 280

Features of Landscape and Mind

Features of Landscape and Mind
2015, 76x61cm, 350

Despite his best efforts he is deprived of eternal life

Despite his best efforts he is deprived of eternal life
2011, 101x76cm

From Chaos

From Chaos
2009, 101x76cm

Seed

Seed
2004, 60x42cm sold

Causality

Causality
2006, 120x80cm

Human beings tend to think in a symbolic way - of objects and relationships. This leads us to attempt to understand the way the world works in terms of cause and effect - that things happen for a reason.

This picture is about causality, in particular, about world events. A simple situation may be easy to understand in terms of cause and effect, but when it comes to world events, there are so many factors involved that we can only try to analyse the patterns and trends resulting from the chaotic nature of the world. This picture is an attempt to reflect this situation.

The picture is a single line drawn in biro. Since the line is so long and goes over itself, we cannot see the path of the line, only the patterns resulting from it. In this way, we cannot see the exact nature of what happens in the world, only the 'ripples on the surface', and it is in our nature to try and interpret these ripples as if they were the only thing there.

By using biro, I was able to continue to draw without a pause, letting the picture progress intuitively. Also, the use of a very simple, mundane and mass-produced object seemed appropriate to depict world events.

The Recliner

The Recliner
2005, 41x31cm sold

In BBC2's 'How Art Made the World' (9th May 2005), it was suggested that artists have used exaggeration in the depiction of the human form throughout history.

I found this interesting, but it did not feel quite right. It missed an underlying principle. If we are exaggerating, why are we exaggerating?

It seems to me that it is not exaggeration that art strives for in the representation of the human form, it is simplification; extraction of the basic forms required for our concepts of human form (or anything else, for that matter). What is essential? This may lead to exaggeration of certain features. We are striving for the concept, rather than the image. How the object exists in our minds as a concept; a series of associations, notionally linked forms. We are trying to make in 2D or 3D, what 'human' is to us.

Entropy

Entropy
2006, 61x76cm

Block and Ball

Block and Ball
2003, 54.6x67.3cm, 350

Equilibrium

Equilibrium
2008, 51x61cm

Gazelle

Gazelle
2005, 52x66cm, 350

On a Shelf

On a Shelf
2004, 55x67cm sold

Peducian Man

Peducian Man
2009, 61x76cm, 385

I have always found that my paintings are a product of both the initial idea and the painting process itself; it is not simply a matter of transferring the completed idea onto the canvas. In the past, I have used this to take me in new directions. Although I may think I know how the painting will turn out, as I start to paint, what I see changes how I proceed. I make decisions based on the partially complete picture. Often, the paint doesn't want to do what you want it to do, and the painting changes from the initial idea.

I thought it would be interesting to detach myself from this 'interference' from external factors for a change. As I saw it, the only way I could ignore how the painting was progressing in order to use only the initial idea, was not to see the painting as it progressed. I would have to blindfold myself during the painting process.

I have used several techniques of painting blindfolded. In the purest form, I am blindfolded from white canvas to finished painting, using notches in a cardboard palette to locate a particular colour ('Dimension Spell', 'Horizon Spell'). In a variation of this technique, I allow myself to see the palette, but not the canvas ('Vision Spell', 'Resurrection Spell', 'Peducian Napsis'), as I found that the mechanics of locating paint on the palette detracted from the fluidity of painting.

In a further effort to preserve fluidity, I tried another method; drawing the initial design on the canvas using marker pens whilst blindfolded, then finishing using paint with the blindfold removed ('First Colony', 'Scaffold', 'Offering Spell', 'Peducian Man', 'Peducian Sunset', 'Nightmare Spell', 'Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous').

Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous

Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous
2009, 61x76cm, 350

I have always found that my paintings are a product of both the initial idea and the painting process itself; it is not simply a matter of transferring the completed idea onto the canvas. In the past, I have used this to take me in new directions. Although I may think I know how the painting will turn out, as I start to paint, what I see changes how I proceed. I make decisions based on the partially complete picture. Often, the paint doesn't want to do what you want it to do, and the painting changes from the initial idea.

I thought it would be interesting to detach myself from this 'interference' from external factors for a change. As I saw it, the only way I could ignore how the painting was progressing in order to use only the initial idea, was not to see the painting as it progressed. I would have to blindfold myself during the painting process.

I have used several techniques of painting blindfolded. In the purest form, I am blindfolded from white canvas to finished painting, using notches in a cardboard palette to locate a particular colour ('Dimension Spell', 'Horizon Spell'). In a variation of this technique, I allow myself to see the palette, but not the canvas ('Vision Spell', 'Resurrection Spell', 'Peducian Napsis'), as I found that the mechanics of locating paint on the palette detracted from the fluidity of painting.

In a further effort to preserve fluidity, I tried another method; drawing the initial design on the canvas using marker pens whilst blindfolded, then finishing using paint with the blindfold removed ('First Colony', 'Scaffold', 'Offering Spell', 'Peducian Man', 'Peducian Sunset', 'Nightmare Spell', 'Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous').

Scaffold (Ascension Spell)

Scaffold (Ascension Spell)
2008, 76x101cm sold

I have always found that my paintings are a product of both the initial idea and the painting process itself; it is not simply a matter of transferring the completed idea onto the canvas. In the past, I have used this to take me in new directions. Although I may think I know how the painting will turn out, as I start to paint, what I see changes how I proceed. I make decisions based on the partially complete picture. Often, the paint doesn't want to do what you want it to do, and the painting changes from the initial idea.

I thought it would be interesting to detach myself from this 'interference' from external factors for a change. As I saw it, the only way I could ignore how the painting was progressing in order to use only the initial idea, was not to see the painting as it progressed. I would have to blindfold myself during the painting process.

I have used several techniques of painting blindfolded. In the purest form, I am blindfolded from white canvas to finished painting, using notches in a cardboard palette to locate a particular colour ('Dimension Spell', 'Horizon Spell'). In a variation of this technique, I allow myself to see the palette, but not the canvas ('Vision Spell', 'Resurrection Spell', 'Peducian Napsis'), as I found that the mechanics of locating paint on the palette detracted from the fluidity of painting.

In a further effort to preserve fluidity, I tried another method; drawing the initial design on the canvas using marker pens whilst blindfolded, then finishing using paint with the blindfold removed ('First Colony', 'Scaffold', 'Offering Spell', 'Peducian Man', 'Peducian Sunset', 'Nightmare Spell', 'Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous').

First Colony (Civilisation Spell)

First Colony (Civilisation Spell)
2008, 76x101cm, 450

I have always found that my paintings are a product of both the initial idea and the painting process itself; it is not simply a matter of transferring the completed idea onto the canvas. In the past, I have used this to take me in new directions. Although I may think I know how the painting will turn out, as I start to paint, what I see changes how I proceed. I make decisions based on the partially complete picture. Often, the paint doesn't want to do what you want it to do, and the painting changes from the initial idea.

I thought it would be interesting to detach myself from this 'interference' from external factors for a change. As I saw it, the only way I could ignore how the painting was progressing in order to use only the initial idea, was not to see the painting as it progressed. I would have to blindfold myself during the painting process.

I have used several techniques of painting blindfolded. In the purest form, I am blindfolded from white canvas to finished painting, using notches in a cardboard palette to locate a particular colour ('Dimension Spell', 'Horizon Spell'). In a variation of this technique, I allow myself to see the palette, but not the canvas ('Vision Spell', 'Resurrection Spell', 'Peducian Napsis'), as I found that the mechanics of locating paint on the palette detracted from the fluidity of painting.

In a further effort to preserve fluidity, I tried another method; drawing the initial design on the canvas using marker pens whilst blindfolded, then finishing using paint with the blindfold removed ('First Colony', 'Scaffold', 'Offering Spell', 'Peducian Man', 'Peducian Sunset', 'Nightmare Spell', 'Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous').

Warrior

Warrior
2009, 76x101cm, 450

Chalice

Chalice
2009, 76x101cm, 450

Dragon

Dragon
2009, 76x101cm, 450